Self-Care Behaviors

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People with diabetes use social media to meet and interact with a community of people with similar experiences, to share information, and to provide and receive support. People now have an insatiable appetite for information as they make daily choices in managing their diabetes. Kerri Sparling speaks about social media use among people with diabetes.
Acceptance of diabetes and its related self-management principles is complex and involves a number of skills and tasks. Assessment of diabetes acceptance may aid in the identification of high-risk patients for whom interventions can be targeted. Mark Heyman, PhD, CDCES shares his experience and case studies related to working with people who are having difficulty with acceptance and diabetes
Healthcare provider burnout is increasing in prevalence and poses a threat to our healthcare system. Burnout was a syndrome identified 30 years ago, and is characterized by depersonalization, emotional exhaustion, and a sense of low personal accomplishment. Characteristics of the healthcare environment coupled with personal factors place healthcare providers at risk for burnout.
Teresa Pearson, MS, RN, CDCES, FADCES and Hope Warshaw, RD, CDCES, BC-ADM define the Social Context of Diabetes across the lifespan, and provide suggestions and examples for what healthcare professionals can do to encourage social support virtually and in real life.
Living with diabetes can be overwhelming and may ultimately lead to “burnout” which can add to the myriad of challenges already faced by someone with a chronic disease like diabetes. Symptoms of burnout can include depression, lack of hope, and frustration. These symptoms impact adults and adolescents alike and may diminish their ability to manage their disease. Mark Heyman, PhD, CDCES shares his experience working with patients with diabetes and helping them avoid or overcome the mental health challenges of living with diabetes.
Representatives from the American Diabetes Association and the Association of Diabetes Care and Education Specialists released a consensus statement about the use of language in diabetes care and education. The statement provides recommendations for language used by healthcare professionals and others when discussing diabetes through spoken or written words.